• Christ's Entry into Jerusalem

    Artist:
    Maître de l'autel de Thuizon, Amiens school, active second half of the 15th century
    Technique:
    oil
    Dimensions:
    117,5x51 cm

Maître de l'autel de Thuizon, Amiens school, active second half of the 15th century

Christ's Entry into Jerusalem

France, 1460-1470

All four Gospels describe Christ's entry into Jerusalem, which marks the start of Christ's Passion, his week of suffering leading to his death and resurrection. The work comes from the Abbey of St Honorius in Thuison and represents one wing of a folding wooden altar, the remaining seven parts of which are now in the Art Institute of Chicago. In the foreground is Christ riding an ass, with the twelve apostles following him. To the right in the depth are the city gates and the inhabitants of Jerusalem who greet Christ with palm branches and spread expensive garments on the ground before him. The painter revealed his keen skills of observation in the expressive and realistic depiction of faces in the crowd, the details of architectural ornament and the flowers and grass by the side of the road. But the construction of space is typically medieval, with planes laid in tiers one over another. Gothic traditions are also felt in the elongated proportions of the figures and the angular folds of drapery. On the basis of the specific combination of Netherlandish influences and typically French details, it has been suggested that the painting was the work of a master from the north east of France (Picardy).

Title:

Christ's Entry into Jerusalem

Place:

Date:

Material:

Technique:

oil

Dimensions:

117,5x51 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 1919; handed over from the State Museum Fund; originally in the Prince G.G. Gagarin collection

Inventory Number:

ГЭ-5699

Category:

Collection:

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